Metals for Your Feet

air jordans

Air Jordan’s originated in 1984 founded by Nike. In the 1980’s gym shoes where I huge part of social media, most musical artist look to shoes to be sponsored at the time Nike was at the bottom of the food chain however they bet all their money on a newly started rookie basketball player named Michel Jordan. At this time the NBA had every strike guide lines to the shoes the players wore, they had to fit the uniform of the team but also had to have some symbolize of white on the shoes. The original Air Jordan ones where all white and black as are the Bulls color, Michel knowing this would take the fine and penalty just so he can wear the shoe every game, giving the shoe more of a desirable element. Two years after the Air Jordan where released the idea of the serious of shoes went into place, creating a new shoe every season. The 1’s designed by Peter Moore, air Jordan 2 designed by Peter Moore and Bruce Kilgore, air Jordan 3-13 by Tinker Hatfield. Now Tinker Hatfield who created some of the most recognizable Jordan’s had the idea of combining two unlikely things to make an every better. Shoes for the NBA where always made to only fallow their guide lines and for athletic purposed but now Air Jordan’s where changing that using materials like elephant skin print on the air Jordan 3s. Jordan’s at this point where just shoes that people would ware but a symbol. The between shoes being advertise and entertainment mixed. In 1989 Air Jordan had a contracted with director Spike Lee for Jordan’s to have a leading role in a movie (do the right think). The most amazing thing is that each Jordan has a special element to it something that makes it unique for example the Air 3s elephant print, Air 8 the straps, and the Air 10’s the amazing lines on the bottom of the shoe.  Each shoe also has a special name giving it more credible than just another shoe. Unfortunately the shoe also became every popular in the gang civilization, people would get into fist fight or even mugged for a fresh new pair of Jordan’s. Never the less Jordan’s never lost their value the shoe is symbolic to have this shoe especially ones that came out for the first time for the best material where the best. People might say well they are just shoes but they really aren’t just as some women brag over what name brand purse they carry or the type of heals they  ware Jordan’s had the same type of impact. They were a way to express one self, how clean and nice you kept your Jordan’s reflected on the type of person you were.

  • Do you have a favorite pair of Air Jordan’s and why? (link below that list all and shoes all the Air Jordan’s )
  • Can you relate the social status of Jordan’s to a person item like purse, art supplies, and etcetera?
  • Do you think the crave for Jordan shoes is a legit able thing or do you think its nonsense to have so much crave over shoes?

http://sneakernews.com/air-jordan-brand-jordan/

*Just For Kicks: a Documentary about sneakers, hip-hop and the corporate game. (must watch movie if you like shoes)

 Crystal Roman

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7 thoughts on “Metals for Your Feet

  1. I personally like the Air Jordan I. I like the classic nike symbol and high top. I can relate to having an item of acclaimed value, for example when iPod’s were the thing to get or the newest model of a phone. I think your example of Jordans compared to purses is funny and completely true. I couldn’t really connect with having the awe over getting a pair of Jordan’s but getting a new purse I can deffinately say i’ve had my share of expensive purchases. It’s kind of the same thing. When you look at a girls purse you can see if she takes care of it or just throws it around and doesn’t take care of it. You can deffinately see what a person is truely like when it comes to taking care of their shoes too. I mean there’s a great history to them and kind of respect when you see someone else wearing them. I personally don’t have the connection to Jordan’s because I don’t wear them but then again something I love, someone else may think nothing of. To each their own.

  2. I don’t wear Jordan shoes, I never got into the fashion of wearing the shoes. Mainly because they are really expensive and I don’t find them intriguing enough to pay up the price they go for. To me tennis shoes are tennis shoes if they provide my feet with flexibility and comfort for running I usually buy them, if I want an expensive pair of shoes most likely they are going to be dress shoes. I guess we all have our weaknesses when it comes to shoes, it all depends on what we view as fashionable. I wouldn’t be able to relate Jordan shoes to purses, art supplies and other stuff because I don’t see them as a high commodity. I think is fine to like Jordan shoes they’re very popular and so is a trend that keeps on growing .

  3. I do not have a favorite pair of Jordan’s. I was never had an appeal to them because of how they blew up in the pop culture world and I’m not the kind of person to jump into new fads. I can definitely see how Jordan’s, like any other object, can become addicting to collect. I have that problem with music and various kinds of bracelets. I do believe that there is a legitimate craving for such objects but sometimes it can be a little extreme.

  4. There is no better feeling than debuting a fresh new pair of Jordans. I love jordans; the design, feel, craftmanship is all appealing to me (However any jordan after 11 is ugly in my opinion). My favorite designs are 4-7. I used to have a lot of pairs of jordans when i was younger but as i got older and got a job i had to give up on the shoes because i started to realize how expensive the shoes actually are. I completely understand the craze, meaning wanting the shoe, but i do not understand why people find it okay to spend $150+ (that they don’t have) on their feet and not on more important things. Although I admit I’m being hypocritical because i have spent $150 on jordans before, but i realize now that its not worth it. Although I generally don’t wear/buy jordans that much any more, they will always be my favorite brand of shoes.

  5. I personally like air jordans, I think they are a good quality name brand shoe, what I don’t like is the prices. They do last a long time but the prices are just outrageous. I know lots of Jordan “addicts”… I don’t like them that much. I personally own one pair myself, but I do buy jordans for my son often, they last longer and his size is not as expensive. I do not have a favorite pair, I’m more of a sandals kind of girl. I can relate to the addiction of shoes just not jordans, I do think some people go overboard with the “shoe game” idea but I guess I love having all kids of sandals.

  6. I don’t have a favorite pair of Jordans. Can’t say that I’ve every been drawn to the name on something. If it’s good quality, I’ll pay for it but not because of the name. It does seem like every area of our culture has their own “brand” that qualifies as the status symbol such as BMW or Jaguar cars, Gucci purses, Jimmy Choo heels, and Rolex watches. I think its common for people to be drawn to or crave status symbols. It seems to be part of human nature.

  7. Very cool blog post. Just goes to show that many things can be a form of art, including shoes such as Air Jordans. I personally do not have a favorite pair of Air Jordans because I do not own any, they are not my style. I do like how they look though and I would have a hard time picking a favorite pair. You can connect the social status because shoes make a unique statement. Air Jordans come from a strong and reputable brand and they are based on one of the best basketball players of all time. I also do not think that hype over shoes is nonsense, because they are a form of art and they can be a big part of someone’s style.

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